That’s Funny!

A sense of humor can be a gift from God. It can also be taught. Almost every baby I’ve ever met had some sense of the funny and the silly.

images

Being playful certainly helps develop that sense of whimsy. When my grandson Mac was about nine months old, he was sitting in his highchair with his sippy cup. He set the cup on the tray and carefully pushed it forward with a twinkle in his eye. I saw this and carefully pushed the cup back. Mac laughed with his whole body and then with one finger, pushed the cup toward me. We played this wonderful game for about ten minutes, pushing the sippy cup back and forth, laughing the entire time.

Believe me – children understand humor!

As kids get older, their sense of humor changes. Granddaughter Marie is deep into Knock-Knock jokes.  What is even funnier is when she forgets the punch line of one joke and goes straight into the next one. Hysterical!

1199488411_283f309fa9

Then, of course, there is the period every child goes through when potty jokes and body parts are the funniest things going. Mostly this period is tolerated by adults rather than encouraged. But sometimes, I have to admit, the jokes can be funny and I can’t help but laugh.

Seeing the funny side of life is the best way to get through a day. The sillier, the better really. I can’t imagine a day in my life without laughter. Who could get through a good day, much less a bad day without some fun and joy? Not me, that’s for sure.

Letting children see you laugh and enjoy the little things around you is the best example ever. They learn more by what you do than by what you say. So I recommend you do both – talk about humor and demonstrate it.

smile

Decide each day to see the humor in the world, laugh at the silly things and enjoy the whimsical.

Decide each day to be the best example of good humor to others, especially the little ones.

Decide each day to encourage the children to laugh and embrace their own unique sense of the humorous.

Unknown

Decide each day to be happy!

Fancy Bottoms

This is a beautiful window I made out of an old window, cabochons (small glass discs with one flat side), and cut-glass dishes.  Of course, it did not start out looking this good.

IF

The project began with an old dirty window I found at a local antique store.  In fact, one of the panes was broken and had to be replaced.

 

IF

 

Some old windows have slots on the sides where cords are attached to run the windows up and down.  I removed the cords from the slots, which are not visible when the window is hanging .

IF

The first thing to do is paint the old window.  I chose Annie Sloan paint because it requires no sanding and dries to a nice matte finish –  white to match the bathroom trim.

 

IF

 

Here is the window all nice and painted white.  What a difference, right?  I then used a razor scraper on the panes to remove the paint I got on them – no need for masking.  The window was ready for decorating!

IF

I looked for glass dishes that had nice fancy bottoms because they would be glued on upside-down.  I bought glass cabochons online in four different sizes to set off the dishes, using different layouts in each pane.

Weldbond glue holds everything very well and dries clear.  All the pieces were glued to the glass panes with the window laying flat.  Any design will work – use your imagination and lay the pieces out in varying ways.

Simple chains and hooks from the hardware store are used to hang it from the window frame.

Here’s the window in the bathroom over the tub at sunset with no lights on.  I love it!

IF

A different view of the window with the lights on.  Isn’t it amazing?

IF

This is the window after sunset – it changes through the day with the varying light.  I hope you enjoy my lovely window as much as I do.

IF

I Need My Veg Time, Granny

This seems to be the age of busyness, always moving, forever going, scheduled to the max and stress beyond measure. When did we forget that we are human beings, not human doings ?

shouting and tired student girl with complex flow planning

And when did it become okay to involve our children in all this over-scheduling, busyness and stress? How did we create a world in which we have more and more and more to do with less time for leisure, less time for reflection, less time for community, less time to just. . . . be?

busy kids

It’s too easy to get caught up in a comfortable schedule where adults and kids are kept busy from sun-up to sun-down. It tells the world the parents are good, responsible, and active. It tells the world the kids are involved, active, smart and well-rounded. What it doesn’t tell the world is that everyone is exhausted, tired, stressed, unhappy, with no time to form the relationships and community that we all so desperately need.

Even people who you think might be able to enjoy some down time pile errands on top of volunteering on top of working out on top of, well, you name it. When the children get home from school, they race from one activity to another and if at some point, life seems to calm down, then it is time to take on a big construction project, get a dog or have a another baby.

busyness2

With summer here, our kids are home more and we have more time for what really matters each day. Relax the schedule at least a bit. Allow for what Mac calls his “veg time” – unscheduled relaxed “being time”.

Lat’s all lean into a better us, a better community of friends. When someone asks “How are you?” let’s assume that’s exactly what they want to know. Not the many items on your to-do list, nor the many requests in your inbox. Assume they want to know how your heart is doing, at this very moment. Tel them how your soul is – happy, sad, aching, worried, whatever. Examine yourself and tell them about YOU!

Put your hand on the arm of the person to whom you are speaking, look them in the eye (and not constantly at your handheld device) and connect for one second. Tell something personal. Remember we are full and complete human beings who also crave undivided attention and friendships.

relationship

Kids need the same as adults – time off from an over-scheduled life and a balanced existence. Sometimes that means unstructured play and relationship with other kids and sometimes it means electronically disconnected time alone with a book. Not every activity requires a team with a play schedule, a coach, a snack list and uniforms.

Children also desperately want to be heard when we ask “How are you?” I challenge us all to insist on a type of connection where when one of us responds, “I am just so busy,” we can follow up with, “I know Sweetie. We all are. But I want to know about YOU and how I can help.

Unknown