Handbell Choir Haiku

Bells, love them I do

Many players, grand concert

Wish I had a bell

The Value Of Mistakes

Oops! Oh no! My bad! How we hate to say or hear those words. How we loathe to fail. How we dislike to make mistakes. But they happen so often. They occur no matter how hard we try. We all seem so prone to make them. How can we make the best of them?

Mistakes are positive, valuable occurrences. They make it easier to make decisions in the future. They let you know what works and what doesn’t work. By trying possible solutions and taking risks, you find out, eventually, what will be the answer, but not without many, many failures along the way.

You cannot, however, be overwhelmed by your mistakes. Analyze them and be responsible for them, so you are less likely to repeat the same ones but don’t be paralyzed by them. Always be willing to get up from every failure. Always be willing to take a risk again. Always be willing to try one more time.

Each failure is valuable information. Each failure is a possible resolution that never has to be tried again. Each failure is a road that never has to be taken because we know the answer is not there. That is knowledge and wisdom.

Mistakes can build self-confidence by requiring you to take risks. If you are not making any mistakes, you are not trying. You are not really living.

Dealing with failure means you are stepping out of your comfort zone – out into the unknown where only failure and success are possible. Staying comfortable and safe means you will have no failure but neither will you have any success.

Dealing with failure means you are brave and strong. It means you have the ability to learn and grow from those errors. Everything changes after a mistake – make it a positive change.

Every mistake is a learning opportunity – a moment of growth. Very seldom do we become better people during the easy times in our lives but we can make great strides during the tough times. Those are the times of self-analysis and self-reflection. Mistakes definitely help set boundaries for us.

Being open about your mistakes keeps you honest and humble. Your sense of integrity is improved when you take responsibility for your errors and look for ways to correct them. It’s not the mistake itself, it’s how you deal with it that shows your character.

Mistakes can allow you to inspire others. Any mistake and lesson you learn can be taught to another person. It can be a very moving and personal moment to help someone avert making the same error as you. In fact, it is your job to pass this knowledge onto the next generations.

Mistakes add so much to our lives. Embrace them. Learn from them. Share them. Keep making them.

Words To Live By

Sometimes I read or hear words that make a huge impression on me and change the way I view the world.  Sometimes these words come from a well-spoken professional person and sometimes they come from one of my grandchildren.  Sometimes these words are the result of a glowing spiritual moment and sometimes they come at the end of a tough disagreement.

Sometimes I understand the words and their meaning immediately and sometimes they require days and days of thoughtful study.  Sometimes it even takes years for the full depth of the meaning to become clear.

I love how words affect people.  I love how words can effect change and growth and maturity. I love how language can make things happen – good and bad, negative and positive, constructive and destructive.

Words are powerful.  They have strength and the ability to change the course of history. They should never be used casually or haphazardly.

Words can harm, hurt and scar people.  Once used, they can never be taken back. And they will be remembered for a lifetime.

Words can also heal, mend and save.  They can repair broken relationships, friendships, families and nations.  They can bring hope to those who are in despair, joy to those who are sad, and peace to those who are in distress.  And they will be remembered for a lifetime.

I really love words that make me think and question and keep me on my toes.  I really love words that remind me to be grateful and be humble and think of others.  I really love words that make me laugh.

I especially relate to the words of John F. Kennedy, “If not us, who? If not now, when?”  These words speak to me as an elder, as a woman, as a leader in my family.

I have a commission to teach, by word and by example, the younger generations how to live and die well, how to deal with the good times and hard times with dignity and grace, and how to become a good, productive member of the community.

I have no time left to waste in doing my job as the matriarch of my clan. The right time is always now.

This job is not easy and takes an entire lifetime to accomplish.  You must look for inspiration in the words and actions of others.  You must set the bar high by always looking for the best in the world around you.

And definitely you must fill your head with strong positive words – words that challenge, uplift, lead and strengthen you.

The world is speaking to you – listen carefully.

 

Becoming A Granny

I was recently talking to Mac about the day he was born. Every time I told him an interesting fact about his birth day, he answered, “I don’t remember that.” (He’s 14 remember. Enough said!)

All that remembering got me thinking about the significance of that day – the day I became a Granny. Another Grandmother was born that day too – Carol, Mac’s other Granny or Grams, as she is called. Grams and I have talked about that special day and agree it is a day we will never forget for many reasons.

First, it’s the  day I became a Grandmother. Sounds simple but is quite profound. To see your daughter become a mother is quite an emotional, touching moment. Certainly more overwhelming than I was expecting or was prepared for.

I laughed, I cried, I applauded, I whispered, I hugged everyone and I fell in love with a new baby boy. What a feeling it is to instantly know you love someone completely, overwhelmingly, with all your heart. Except for my children, I can’t think of another relationship that begins so intensely and so immediately. And then lasts for a lifetime!

I knew at that first moment that this precious boy could have whatever I had, share anything of mine he needed and claim any of my resources that were necessary for him to succeed. If required, I would give my life for his. I knew that and I told him so, on his first day of life.

Mac brought a kind of joy that I had never felt before. It was different than the glow of childbirth. Not better or brighter but certainly as life changing and character altering. He filled a spot in my heart that could not have been filled by anyone but him. I couldn’t have been happier or more blessed.

I also became aware of my responsibilities as a Granny. I suddenly had a new job in the family – that of Grandmother, elder woman, Mother of Mac’s Mother. My new title was a bit sobering in the midst off such great happiness.

My mind was full of all the plans I had for being the world’s best Granny. I would be funny. I would be supportive and say yes as often as possible. I would learn sign language. I would encourage Mac to be kind, generous and fair. I would provide music. I would smock outfits for him. I would teach him games. I would take him outside. I would read to him. I would take him camping. I would teach him to swim and ride bike. I would write him letters. I would kiss him hello and goodbye, every time!

Hard to believe all this happened in an instant. But it was a very special moment of a very special day that I never want to forget.