Word Of The Day – Celebration

I don’t know about you, but I sure do love a good party! Lots of balloons, good food, sweet drinks, happy people, music, dancing, bright lights, maybe some singing and a toast or two. I’m not even sure I need a reason or a real occasion. It can just be a Thursday evening or a spontaneous happening.

I love happy gatherings with laughter and plenty of joy and goodwill. I especially enjoy celebrating the little things in life.

Everyone has a party for the big occasions, like Christmas, New Years and their Birthday, right? But what about giving a big cheer for a rainy day or for the first day of school or for passing the drivers test?

Celebrations are like little “thank you” notes to the world and those we love. There’s so many things to be thankful for that deserve some extra sparkle and shine. I can think of hundreds, maybe more.

Sometimes a celebration can be small with just two people enjoying a special event together. Sometimes it is planned in advance with a structure and a timetable. Sometimes it happens completely in the moment with a spontaneous idea. Sometimes it involves many people gathering from many places in a miraculous union. Sometimes it is colorful, loud and rowdy. Sometimes it is quiet, solemn and reverent.

I think the more grateful we are, the more we feel like celebrating. And the reverse is also true – having a celebratory heart makes us more grateful. They go hand in hand.

Having a celebratory heart is a learned skill. It can be developed, honed and sharpened. A grateful heart just naturally feels joyful, happy and playful. And a party will follow!!!

I have very fond memories of celebrations large – weddings, births, funerals, reunions – and small – grandson’s drawing being chosen for display, lunches with friends, quilt show awards, hugs from my husband.

Some are so tender in my memory, I can still cry thinking of them. That’s how important it is to mark these moments in our lives. It is imperative that we make events memorable and special, that we remember to be grateful for each little second that we are given.

To celebrate is to remember.

To remember is to be grateful.

The Gift Of Water

I can’t imagine turning on my faucet and nothing flowing out. I can’t imagine being unable to bathe any time I wanted. I can’t imagine not being able to water my garden and lawn whenever needed.

I can’t imagine these things because they have never happened. I’ve always had water available to me . And because of that, I’m sure I take it for granted.

If I had to walk miles for my water, I would be more grateful. If I had to carry my water for every use, I would be more grateful. If I had to boil my water to be sure it was clean, I would be more grateful.

But as it is, I use water daily without thinking about it. I trust it will always be available, be plentiful and be clean

Thinking about it now, I am ashamed that I am not more mindful of all the people involved in providing this luxury for me. ( And in most of the world it is a luxury.) How many people does it take to provide me with a glass water, anyway? I don’t even know.

I’m so used to water being in my life, I don’t even question it or worry about it. I’m embarrassed ┬áto admit this all in public. but I know nothing can change unless ii is faced. So i admit to you, my sweet readers, I take clean water for granted.

I want to know better. I wants to do better. I want to be better. I want to be a mindful consumer. I want to be a grateful user.

That will only happen if I remember. Remember to be thankful each time I see water come from my faucet. Remember to not waste any of my precious water. Remember to use my water helpfully. Remember to think of those who provided my water. Remember those in the world who aren’t blessed with water as I am.

Yes, I will remember.

 

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A Look At A Book 5

“Memory Bottles” by Beth Shoshan

Nobody knows what Mr. McAllistair keeps in the colorful bottles which fill the shelves of his shed and sparkle with hidden secrets. “Memories!” Mr. McAllistair says concerning his shed full of bottles. “Each bottle holds exactly one of my most special memories. So when I’m old and I can’t remember things I just open a bottle and everything comes rushing back!”

Mr. McAllistair and his young friend spend the day reminiscing and opening bottle after bottle . . . red ones, frosted ones, tall ones, round ones, twisty ones, double ones, super-skinny topped ones. They laugh, they cheer, they travel through the years of Mr. McAllistair’s life. At day’s end there is one bottle left unopened. “What’s in that one, Mr McAllistair?” asks the boy. Mr. McAllistair leaps up, shouting, “TODAY! I’m going to save the memory of today in this bottle!”

What an absolutely charming book! What a sweet way to show how older people can share their lives, past and present, with the younger folk. And it also includes the younger ones enjoying that interaction. This book is one big, delightful tickle!

The book is not very long, only 24 pages. But the illustrations are grand and colorful. Mr. McAllistair’s memories are very touching and take the two from his childhood to his grandchildren. What a great story to share with your “grand” ones and remember your own best memories. There are many ways to store them, even if we don’t have bottles!

The last page shows Mr. McAllistair and his young friend together in the shed, after a wonderful day of sharing. The young boy says, ” . . . . and we fall back into the chairs laughing.” Isn’t that a fine end to a fine memorable day?